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3 Easy Ways to Donate

Three ways to donate to The Salvation Army. Our Salvation Army trucks will come to you. Schedule a pickup and enter a pickup location today. Giving is easy to those in need.

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Three ways to donate to The Salvation Army. We have hundreds of drop-off locations nationwide. Find a location near you. Purchased goods from our Family Thrift Stores help fund rehabilitation for men and women in need.

Drop Off Goods

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Donate your vehicle. Even if it is not running, we will take your unwanted car, pickup or minivan. It's easy to donate your car and it's tax-deductible. Purchased goods from our Family Thrift Stores help fund rehabilitation for men and women in need.

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Whose Life Will Your Donation Transform?

Donated goods to The Salvation Army goes toward our rehabilitation centers to save men suffering from addiction and poverty. Purchased goods from our Family Thrift Stores help fund rehabilitation for men and women in need.

There is a God. If He can change me, He can change anybody.

Arzell says he's thankful that his life before The Salvation Army isn't as bad as some of the stories he's heard. Which, in itself, is a terrifying thing.

Even though he was using and selling drugs, Arzell strove to do the right thing. But even that put him in harm's way. One night, while trying to break up a fight and help his injured friend, Arzell was run through with a machete by a gang member. He woke up from a coma two weeks later, realizing that he should be dead.

His father, who was a drug user himself, promised he would get clean if Arzell would get help. So Arzell went to The Salvation Army.

At first, Arzell hated the program and the structure. But now he loves it. He knew he could leave at any time, which many men did, but he told himself, “I've never completed anything in my life. I want to complete this.”

Today, he describes himself as “clean, sober and serene.” And he wants to be a soldier for The Salvation Army.

“They're more than a family … they're angels.”

Your charitable donations to The Salvation Army ARC change lives. Through rehabilitation, women and men suffering from addiction are able to gain their lives back. Purchased goods from our Family Thrift Stores help fund rehabilitation for men and women in need.

“I don't want to forget the past, but I don't want to live in it.”

Nellie was the mother of two young daughters when she was introduced to crack cocaine and alcohol.

That led to what she calls “13 years of self-destruction.”

“I was a dope fiend. I tried to hold on to my morals, but unfortunately … I was one of 'them.' ”

She was in and out of jails and prison. She gave her daughters to her mother to raise because she was living on the streets, in the pursuit of a continuous high. She was shot, stabbed, and she was up for an even longer stint in prison when, “by the grace of God,” she was sentenced instead to treatment.

“I was determined to go to treatment with a willingness to learn whatever I had to learn and do whatever I needed to do … just like I did when I was out there looking for my drugs. I did whatever I had to do to get my drugs. That's how low it took me.”

She was determined to change. And that is what she did. “I walked through the doors of The Salvation Army knowing, no matter what, that I have to have a stronger desire to stay clean than to get high.”

Today, Nellie is clean and sober. She values her sobriety. She is a good, strong mother once again to her daughters. And she is pursuing a career as a licensed drug counselor so she can help other women turn their lives around.

The Salvation Army changes lives through our rehab centers found nationwide. Men who are suffering from addiction and poverty are able to get their lives back. Purchased goods from our Family Thrift Stores help fund rehabilitation for men and women in need.

“When I came in here, I wasn't a whole person. I was a shell of a person.”

When James graduated from high school, his friends all left for college, leaving him behind. He fell in with the wrong crowd, and experimentation with drugs led to a 10-year methamphetamine addiction. James ended up alienating himself from every last family member and friend.

With no place left to go, he walked through the doors of The Salvation Army's Adult Rehabilitation Center.

“The way people treated me when I got here wasn't the way people treated me on the outside. People here treated me like a human being again. They loved me when I couldn't love myself.”

Recovery wasn't easy, and during his stay, James saw plenty of people quit the ARC program. But he was determined to stay. And that's just what he did.

“I got belief in myself again,” James says. “I got God.”

Now, James has been clean for four years, and he has a purpose in life.

“God had another plan for me. He wanted me to go out and tell people about Him.” And so, along with his wife, he now ministers to others, teaching them about God, as a music evangelist.

The Salvation Army transforms lives. Men who are suffering from addiction and poverty are able to get their lives back because of charitable donations. Purchased goods from our Family Thrift Stores help fund rehabilitation for men and women in need.

“All the hate, the sadness in my heart, the loneliness … it's gone.”

At 19 years old, Patrick was working four jobs to support his wife and baby son. But when he wasn't working, he was drinking. The alcoholism began to get violent, drugs were added into the mix and things just got worse and worse.

“I always had people who wanted to help me. But I didn't like myself. I hated myself.”

At one point, Patrick was on Fort Worth's Top Ten Most Wanted list for grand theft auto. He was introduced to crack cocaine, which led to a heart attack. And he even put a gun to his head and pulled the trigger. But the gun failed.

Finally, he fell down and said, “God, please, take this away. I can't do it anymore.” Then he took the first step toward changing his life by calling The Salvation Army's Adult Rehabilitation Center.

“The Salvation Army builds an army of brotherhood and fellowship, helping people who are down and out and feel like they're nothing, like they're dirt … bringing them back up and saying, 'You're not. You're worth more.'”

Today, Patrick is sober and drug-free. He has reunited with his children. And he has discovered the person he was meant to be.

“I am a good person. I love myself. And I love The Salvation Army. I'd do anything for them.”

We make giving and charitable donations easy so that we can help adults suffering from drug and alcohol addiction and poverty get their lives back. Purchased goods from our Family Thrift Stores help fund rehabilitation for men and women in need.

“I learned more in my 11 months at The Salvation Army than I learned in 42 years of life.”

Husband. Father. Businessman. Paul had a good life. Then he lost it all to alcohol and crack cocaine.

“I did things I never thought I would do … Using around my kids. Lying to my children and my family. Stealing from my family. Stealing from my company.”

Paul went to two or three different treatment centers to try and get the help he needed, but none were spiritually based. “I still had a huge hole inside me. A lot of guilt. A lot of shame.”

Homeless and spiritually bankrupt, Paul finally walked into the chapel of The Salvation Army Adult Rehabilitation Center, hit his knees and said, “God, I give up.”

But God hadn't given up on him. “He was there. Through The Salvation Army, He was there.”

Now clean and sober, Paul has reunited with his children, rejoined his family business and reclaimed his soul.

“The Salvation Army gave me a chance at redemption. They saved my life … a life I cherish today.”

The Salvation Army changes lives. Men who are suffering from addiction and poverty are able to get their lives back because of charitable donations and goods purchased in our Salvation Army Family Stores.

“Grace … I am covered in it, because I should've been dead a long time ago.

The son of an alcoholic mother, Donald began drinking at age 9. Drinking eventually led to a crack cocaine addiction, jail and homelessness.

As Donald tells it, “I was just existing. I had no interest in love or play or work or home … nothing. I just wanted to stay high.”

“The Salvation Army was the only place I had left to turn to. I went there undisciplined, minimally educated, no coping skills, no sense of who I was … and I just had no hope.”

At The Salvation Army, Donald first learned simple things – “bathing, changing clothes, shaving … a lot of the things people take for granted.”

That structure, along with the counseling he received, made an enormous impact on Donald's life.

“It's been a great experience on a daily basis to learn some new values, some new beliefs, some new principles to live by … becoming more self-aware. I'm just so grateful for the opportunity to be alive today … to be free from a